Does Life Ever Get Easier?

Posted: August 8, 2011 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

I didn’t always know what I wanted to be when I grew up, because “WRITER” was never an option for a Catholic girl. She was given four choices in the old days: mom, nun, teacher, or nurse.

“Mom” always appealed to me, and I became one quite early, and though I never got more than a certificate for being a teacher’s assistant, I was able to teach some computer classes at a local community college for a while.

Nursing was an option until I realized that I was not nurse material. I couldn’t clean up my own kids’ vomit – how would I clean up somebody else’s?

My sister became a nurse, though, and, she looked adorable in her little fashion scrubs. I could easily have been a nurse if all it meant was to wear the uniform.

But I chose a more creative (read destitute) route – graphic design and writing. I fell into graphic design when my college instructor told me I appeared to have a gift for design. “Learn this program,” he told me. Every day I taught myself the program until I KNEW the program. “Teach this program,” he ordered suggested.

I thought my life was set. The pay was excellent. But then he left and the college decided it no longer wanted to use that program.

Then I joined a newspaper where one of the editors was convinced I had what it took to be a writer. He asked me to read “Brian Piccolo: A Short Season,” by Jeannie Morris, and write an article about it. He thought my article, Courage, Cancer, and Brian Piccolo, was excellent and he promised to publish it. But then he died – of cancer. I eventually published it myself.

That seems to be a common theme in my life. Status quo changes when I become part of a group. If I find a lipstick that actually looks good on me, the company stops making it. If I move into an area where the rent has been steady for the past decade, it will rise significantly when I move in. If I find a doctor I like, he or she moves. If I find a job I enjoy, the job changes, and money, once again becomes scarce.

Every day throughout my whole grown up life, I have scrambled to pay the bills. I kept thinking that by the time I got to be 60, my finances would improve. I thought I would be able to relax.

I remember a time when people used to sit in their back yards or on their front porches. Peace and serenity enveloped them like a hammock gently holding them in the branches of a tree. Today people sit in front of computers or cell phones, and speak by means of text messages and instant online messages. The only time they see others in person is when they fill bars and get crazy drunk. Or high.

Everywhere I look I find offers from strangers who will improve my life at “no charge” to me. And then I read the fine print. Some cost is ALWAYS involved.

I see people my age dying or losing their jobs. I don’t even listen to the news anymore. Seems the only news I hear even when I accidentally see it or hear it, is doom and gloom. I would love for somebody to tell me that yes, life does get easier. But more importantly I’d like to hear somebody say, “Here’s how, and it won’t cost you a thing.”

I would also like to prove the saying, “Money doesn’t buy happiness” wrong. Any takers?

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Comments
  1. Beth says:

    One of my sisters used to joke that it was her special talent to “buy high and sell low.” As she approached the age when she had hoped to retire, she no longer found it funny.

    I think that as a society, we’ve gotten a little screwed up regarding money and where it should rank on our priority lists. So much of what we now view as necessities are really extras, yet it’s the rare couple just starting out who doesn’t have them. That sort of mindset makes even people who are getting by just fine, though not living large, have this feeling that they are slackers.

    I’d love to find out for myself whether or not being rich makes someone happier, makes them a jackass, or really doesn’t change them at all–all theories that I’ve heard. For now, for me, it’s all just theory.

    • theresawiza says:

      Thank you, Beth (I’ve been without Internet for most of the last couple of weeks, so this is the first blog I’ve posted). I’d love to test your theory (last paragraph) too.

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